Today’s Patient in Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Does Histology Make A Difference?

An Interactive E-Platform Featuring Patient Simulations
 

GOAL

The proposed educational activity has been designed in a format that will require interactivity and decision making. Participation in this activity will allow participants to gain knowledge and competence with respect to (a) the role of histology in determining the type of chemotherapy that is used, (b) the appropriate maintenance therapies to use in treatment plans for patients with NSCLC, and (c) how to develop strategies to individualize therapy based on histology.

OVERVIEW

Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Despite advances in therapeutic options, only 15% of patients with lung cancer survive beyond 5 years. However, the identification of markers is improving these grim statistics. Recent data suggests there is a correlation between lung cancer histologic subtype and treatment outcomes. Tumor gene expression can now be used to predict which patients would respond to targeted therapy. Personalized therapy for patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is customizing treatment based on genomics as well as tumor histology. Considering these advances, our interactive educational activity is designed to bring the participant into a virtual clinical setting allowing the application of this knowledge. Video cases, interactive decision points, and expert rationale will guide the participant through this activity.

TARGET AUDIENCE

This activity is designed for oncologists, hematologists, and oncology nursing professionals. No prerequisites required.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon the conclusion of this activity, the participant should be able to:
  • IDENTIFY how histologic subtypes of NSCLC can guide the selection of chemotherapy.
  • DEVELOP strategies to individualize therapy based on NSCLC histology.
  • DETERMINE appropriate maintenance therapy for patients with advanced NSCLC.
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine takes responsibility for the content, quality, and scientific integrity of this CME activity.

CME INFORMATION

Accreditation Statement — The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation Statement — The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)TM. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

After reviewing this interactive case study activity, participants may receive credit by completing the CME test, evaluation, and receiving a score of 70% or higher.

Full Disclosure Policy Affecting CME Activities —As a provider accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), it is the policy of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine to require the disclosure of the existence of any significant financial interest or any other relationship a faculty member or a sponsor has with the manufacturer(s) of any commercial product(s) discussed in an educational presentation. The Participating Faculty reported the following:

David S. Ettinger, MD (Chair)
The Alex Grass Professor of Oncology
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Professor of Medicine, Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Gynecology and Obstetrics, and Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences
Baltimore, Maryland

Dr Ettinger reports serving as a consultant for AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Celgene Corporation, Eisai Inc, Eli Lilly and Company, Genentech, Inc, GlaxoSmithKline, ImClone Systems Incorporated, Merck & Co, Inc, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Pfizer Inc, and Sanofi-Aventis.

Rosalyn Juergens, MD
Assistant Professor in Oncology
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland

Dr Jeurgens reports serving as a principal investigator on grants from AstraZeneca, OSI Pharmaceuticals, Inc, and Taiho Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd; serving as a coinvestigator for Cellectar, LLC; and serving as a consultant for Cellectar, LLC, ImClone Systems Incorporated, and Taiho Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd.

Howard (Jack) West, MD
Medical Director, Thoracic Oncology Program
Swedish Cancer Institute
Seattle, Washington

Dr West reports receiving honoraria from and serving as a consultant for Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and Eli Lilly and Company; and serving on the speakers’ bureau for Eli Lilly and Company.

Note: Grants to investigators at The Johns Hopkins University are negotiated and administered by the institution which receives the grant, typically through the Office of Research Administration. Individual investigators who participate in the sponsored project(s) are not directly compensated by the sponsor, but may receive salary or other support from the institution to support their effort on the project(s).

Off-Label Product Discussion
No speaker has indicated that their presentation will include information on off-label products.

Disclaimer Statement
The opinions and recommendations expressed by faculty and other experts whose input is included in this activity are their own. This enduring material is produced for educational purposes only. Use of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine name implies review of educational format, design, and approach. Please review the complete prescribing information of specific drugs or combinations of drugs, including indications, contraindications, warnings, and adverse effects, before administering pharmacologic therapy to patients.

Internet CME Policy
The Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME) at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is committed to protect the privacy of its members and customers. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine CME maintains its Internet site as an information resource and service for physicians, other health professionals, and the public. Continuing Medical Education at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine will keep your personal and credit information confidential when you participate in a CME Internet-based activity. Your information will never be given to anyone outside of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s CME activity. CME collects only the information necessary to provide you with the services that you request.

Release date: March 2010. Expiration date: March 2012.

Estimated time to complete activity: 1.5 hours.

Activity Format: Three interactive video case studies.

Pre-test

Case Study 1: 75-Year-Old Male Smoker Diagnosed with Nonsquamous Cell Lung Cancer
David S. Ettinger, MD

Case Study 2: 42-Year-Old Non-Smoking Female Diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma Lung Cancer
Howard (Jack) West, MD

Case Study 3: 67-Year-Old Male Previous Smoker Diagnosed with Squamous Cell Lung Cancer
Rosalyn Juergens, MD

Post-test


Case Study 1: 75-Year-Old Male Smoker Diagnosed with Nonsquamous Cell Lung Cancer
David S. Ettinger, MD











Case Study 2: 42-Year-Old Non-Smoking Female Diagnosed with Adenocarcinoma Lung Cancer
Howard (Jack) West, MD











Case Study 3: 67-Year-Old Male Previous Smoker Diagnosed with Squamous Cell Lung Cancer
Rosalyn Juergens, MD








 

Supported by an educational grant from Lilly USA, LLC.

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